Jodie Cook Explores concepts in entrepreneurship, happiness and lifestyle design

Read Time:6 Minute

Some grown-ups never consider becoming an entrepreneur. They see it as a risk. They don’t have the confidence that leaping requires. They have been talked out of it by someone else. They fear failure. None of these are good reasons not to start a business.

If those fearful adults had been raised to be entrepreneurial, they would now be living life according to their agenda and making decisions based on their ability, instead of the opinions, agendas and pessimistic projections of the people around them. Through my work, I have been able to distill the childhood trends of successful entrepreneurs and gain an insight into how these individuals were raised and how parents are actively passing on their skills to the next generation.

What does entrepreneurial mean?

Entrepreneurial means confident, positive, creative, resourceful, and resilient. An entrepreneurial person is someone who is faced with a problem and works out the solution. Their convictions rally a tribe and their ideas pick up momentum. An entrepreneurial person makes their own decisions and never forgets they always have choices. An entrepreneurial person doesn’t need to be an entrepreneur.

The sooner someone operates in this way, the sooner it becomes a habit, and the more they dictate their future. An entrepreneurial kid is practicing this now. An entrepreneurial kid is heading towards a future of possibility, of happiness, abundance, and success, whatever success happens to mean to them at the time.

From gathering hundreds of stories from entrepreneur childhoods, here’s the four-part framework for raising entrepreneurial kids:

1.   Cultivate the mindset

Instilling an entrepreneurial mindset involves looking both inward and outward. Inward: at the mindset and attitude someone develops towards how they see their abilities, how they frame success and failure, and how confidently they approach new situations. Outward: the belief that they can positively affect change or create something of value, or how they view work and what its place might be in their future.

Entrepreneurial people look at change and see opportunity. They look at the disruption and see a chance to add value. They look at problems and see solutions. They are challenged and they rise above. They are doubted and they exceed all expectations. Day-to-day experiences bring ways to model this mindset and behavior within a family and at school.

In practice, helping someone to develop an entrepreneurial mindset means assisting them to believe in themselves and to dream big about what their future could hold. It means guiding them to seeing the best in others and situations. To view disruption and change positively and to truly believe that they are strong and capable enough of overcoming barriers. To understand the huge value they could bring to the world. To learn commitment and the value of practicing to reach mastery. It means seeing mistakes and failures as opportunities to start again, to do better, or to learn.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleppy
Sleppy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Facebook Comments

Social profiles